World war 1 essay intro

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Besides overcoming a persistent anti-war sentiment, President Wilson had to deal with a large percentage of American citizens who were from other cultures, notably Germany, against whom we were fighting in the war. High on the government's agenda was the need to win the support of the citizenry for home front support and recruiting. Among the many early "call to arms" songs written right before the war or as the US enetered the war was this stirring song, Wake Up America (click cover for the Scorch version, here for midi and here for lyrics .) In 1917 the government formed a new agency entitled the Committee on Public Information (CPI) in order to sway public opinion in favor of the war and all that it might eventually involve. This was the crux of an extraordinary propaganda campaign aimed at shaping public opinion in America in favor of the war effort. A progressive and influential journalist named George Creel was chosen to head the agency which employed 75,000 speakers ("four-minute men") hired to deliver patriotic messages to churches, music halls, schools, and other public places using music as one of their main modes of transport. (Ewen, 2-3) . Songs written by government composers identified only as "Army Song Leaders" centered on addressing the cultural diversity of our citizens entering the United States Army linked by the common desire to win the war against Germany. An example of one of these songs is Good Morning, Mr. Zip-Zip-Zip (Scorch format) in which the lyrics show how the Army takes people from diverse groups and regiments them together for the same purpose. The "Zip-Zip-Zip" in the song title means that you can insert any name (first, middle, last) of any nationality, religion, or ethnic group. They are all taken equally. This is seen in the sample of the lyrics as follows: "We come from ev'ry quarter, From North, South, East, and West,
To clear the way to freedom, For the land we love the best.
We've left our occupations, And home, so far and dear,
But when the going's rather rough, We raise this song in cheer:
Good morning, Mister Zip-Zip-Zip, With your hair cut just as short as mine,
Good Morning, Mister Zip-Zip-Zip, You're surely looking fine!" (America to War 1B, 2)

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world war 1 essay intro

World war 1 essay intro

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world war 1 essay intro

World war 1 essay intro

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world war 1 essay intro

World war 1 essay intro

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world war 1 essay intro
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World war 1 essay intro

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world war 1 essay intro

World war 1 essay intro


Besides overcoming a persistent anti-war sentiment, President Wilson had to deal with a large percentage of American citizens who were from other cultures, notably Germany, against whom we were fighting in the war. High on the government's agenda was the need to win the support of the citizenry for home front support and recruiting. Among the many early "call to arms" songs written right before the war or as the US enetered the war was this stirring song, Wake Up America (click cover for the Scorch version, here for midi and here for lyrics .) In 1917 the government formed a new agency entitled the Committee on Public Information (CPI) in order to sway public opinion in favor of the war and all that it might eventually involve. This was the crux of an extraordinary propaganda campaign aimed at shaping public opinion in America in favor of the war effort. A progressive and influential journalist named George Creel was chosen to head the agency which employed 75,000 speakers ("four-minute men") hired to deliver patriotic messages to churches, music halls, schools, and other public places using music as one of their main modes of transport. (Ewen, 2-3) . Songs written by government composers identified only as "Army Song Leaders" centered on addressing the cultural diversity of our citizens entering the United States Army linked by the common desire to win the war against Germany. An example of one of these songs is Good Morning, Mr. Zip-Zip-Zip (Scorch format) in which the lyrics show how the Army takes people from diverse groups and regiments them together for the same purpose. The "Zip-Zip-Zip" in the song title means that you can insert any name (first, middle, last) of any nationality, religion, or ethnic group. They are all taken equally. This is seen in the sample of the lyrics as follows: "We come from ev'ry quarter, From North, South, East, and West,
To clear the way to freedom, For the land we love the best.
We've left our occupations, And home, so far and dear,
But when the going's rather rough, We raise this song in cheer:
Good morning, Mister Zip-Zip-Zip, With your hair cut just as short as mine,
Good Morning, Mister Zip-Zip-Zip, You're surely looking fine!" (America to War 1B, 2)

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